Journal cover Journal topic
Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Geosci. Instrum. Method. Data Syst., 6, 39-51, 2017
http://www.geosci-instrum-method-data-syst.net/6/39/2017/
doi:10.5194/gi-6-39-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
01 Feb 2017
Radio-frequency interference mitigating hyperspectral L-band radiometer
Peter Toose1, Alexandre Roy2, Frederick Solheim3, Chris Derksen1, Tom Watts4, Alain Royer2, and Anne Walker1 1Climate Research Division, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Toronto, Ontario, M3H 5T4, Canada
2Centre d'Applications et de Recherches en Télédétection, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, J1K 2R1, Canada
3Dakota Ridge Research and Development, Boulder, Colorado, 80303, USA
4Department of Geography, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 8ST, UK
Abstract. Radio-frequency interference (RFI) can significantly contaminate the measured radiometric signal of current spaceborne L-band passive microwave radiometers. These spaceborne radiometers operate within the protected passive remote sensing and radio-astronomy frequency allocation of 1400–1427 MHz but nonetheless are still subjected to frequent RFI intrusions. We present a unique surface-based and airborne hyperspectral 385 channel, dual polarization, L-band Fourier transform, RFI-detecting radiometer designed with a frequency range from 1400 through  ≈  1550 MHz. The extended frequency range was intended to increase the likelihood of detecting adjacent RFI-free channels to increase the signal, and therefore the thermal resolution, of the radiometer instrument. The external instrument calibration uses three targets (sky, ambient, and warm), and validation from independent stability measurements shows a mean absolute error (MAE) of 1.0 K for ambient and warm targets and 1.5 K for sky. A simple but effective RFI removal method which exploits the large number of frequency channels is also described. This method separates the desired thermal emission from RFI intrusions and was evaluated with synthetic microwave spectra generated using a Monte Carlo approach and validated with surface-based and airborne experimental measurements.

Citation: Toose, P., Roy, A., Solheim, F., Derksen, C., Watts, T., Royer, A., and Walker, A.: Radio-frequency interference mitigating hyperspectral L-band radiometer, Geosci. Instrum. Method. Data Syst., 6, 39-51, doi:10.5194/gi-6-39-2017, 2017.
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Short summary
Radio-frequency interference (RFI) can significantly contaminate the measured radiometric signal of current spaceborne L-band passive microwave radiometers used for monitoring essential climate variables. A 385-channel hyperspectral L-band radiometer system was designed with the means to quantify the strength and type of RFI. The compact design makes it ideal for mounting on both surface and airborne platforms to be used for calibrating and validating measurement from spaceborne sensors.
Radio-frequency interference (RFI) can significantly contaminate the measured radiometric signal...
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