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Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

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Geosci. Instrum. Method. Data Syst., 6, 169-191, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/gi-6-169-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
04 Apr 2017
Radiometric flight results from the HyperSpectral Imager for Climate Science (HySICS)
Greg Kopp et al.

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Short summary
Monitoring and attributing changes in Earth climate requires high-radiometric-accuracy spectral measurements of sunlight reflected from the Earth's surface. The HyperSpectral Imager for Climate Science (HySICS) is a new imaging spectrometer intended to ultimately achieve ~ 0.2 % radiometric accuracies, being ~ 10 × better than existing spaceflight instruments. We describe the results from a high-altitude balloon flight demonstrating techniques intended to meet these high-accuracy requirements.
Monitoring and attributing changes in Earth climate requires high-radiometric-accuracy spectral...
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